A man with a geotechnical survey machine

For better or worse, a soil study

With things progressing and our hopes elevated, we decided to go ahead with a soil study before signing. We’ve seen so many plots since this journey began, including:

  • plots that had already been terraced, badly, meaning drainage would cost a bomb.
  • inaccessible plots necessitating two or three pumps to get concrete to the site for a foundation.
  • sites so far removed from services we’d have to blow half our budget just to get water and electric to the site.
  • stunningly beautiful sites in summer, freezing cold in winter.
  • and so on…

This one, the one we want to build on, seemed to be ticking all the boxes. We were optimistic about the soil study and did it really as a formality and for peace of mind, hence waiting until the 11th hour. What we didn’t expect was a result to come back saying we’d need a footing that goes down to 1.8m.

Why? Well, no-one goes down to 1.8m here! The builders we’ve spoken to think it’s mad. The locals we’ve spoken to think it’s mad! Our neighbour (now sadly deceased) built his house himself on a 60cm foundation. Okay, maybe that’s not enough – it is clay after all – but to his credit the house, built with brick ~20 years ago, is still standing and I can say with certainty there aren’t any cracks in it because he never bothered to render it, so there’s nothing to hide.

But you can’t unknow the known. One the one hand we’re thinking, damn, why did we have this done? We could just have ploughed on with a (relatively) shallow foundation and worry about it later – but we wanted peace of mind with respect to the ground beneath. We were hoping for rock a relatively short distance below the clay. What we’ve got is not that at all.

In a future post I’ll write something about the etude de sol process. It was quick and looked pretty simple. The company we used, Sole Terre, work across France and we really helpful and sent out an engineer so we could get our report back before the August holiday, when all of France typically shuts down. He arrived with his van at 6.30am (it was a good job we’d decided to camp on site!) and just got on with it. Then, just 24 hours later, we had our report. Now the journey begins.

As far as next steps go we’re busy trying to get advice on a suitable foundation – suitable being both for the soil conditions and for our budget. This isn’t somewhere we wanted to be with this build – worrying about finishing before we’ve even started – but it is what it is!

This morning I’ve mailed a couple of UK-trained structural engineers who are based in France, so hopefully they’ll be able to offer some practical suggestions and put us at ease. We’ll see.

Email sent to Jean Baptiste Thevard

Bonjour Monsieur Jean Baptiste Thevard,

J’ai récemment aidé un ami à construire une maison Greb et je prévois de construire une maison Greb à Puivert en France. J’ai le livre Construire son habitation en paille (3ème édition).

Nous sommes dans une zone sismique 3 à Puivert et sommes évidemment préoccupés par les risques liés à la technique Greb (notre maison est R+1, 10m x 8m) mais nous ne trouvons aucune information solide à ce sujet.

Pour essayer de trouver des informations, nous avons visité Apex Artisan à Limoux et ils nous ont suggéré de ne pas construire avec la technique Greb mais d’utiliser une technique différente où les balles sont insérées dans des murs en ossature simple et le contreventement est effectué avec plusieurs foulards diagonaux pour former la résistance au cisaillement.

Les balles de paille seraient ensuite recouvertes de mortier d’argile et de chaux. Le problème, c’est que je ne trouve aucune information où que ce soit où la résistance au cisaillement de cette méthodologie a été testée.

Il nous a dit que la technique Greb n’est pas conforme aux règles détaillées dans les Regles professionnelles de construction en paille, mais dans mon livre (3ème édition), clairement à la page 83, il y a une image de la Technique Greb mais je ne sais pas vraiment pourquoi elle n’est mentionnée comme la Technique Greb dans le livre. Je suis donc un peu confus.

J’ai quelques questions pour lesquelles j’aimerais vraiment recevoir de l’aide :

1) Est-ce que Greb se conforme au Règlement ?

2) La résistance au cisaillement d’une maison Greb est-elle conforme aux exigences sismiques et de vent ?

3) Est-ce qu’un contreventement additionnel d’une maison R+1 Greb (traverses Simpson par exemple) est nécessaire afin de s’assurer que la maison est conforme aux exigences sismiques ?

4) Pourquoi la technique d’accrochage n’est-elle pas nommée comme telle dans le livre Regles professionnelles de construction en paille ?

5) Avant la construction, dois-je attendre la 4e édition de Construire son habitation en paille. Dans l’affirmative, quelles sont les informations complémentaires contenues dans cette édition ?

Merci pour votre temps.

Sincèrement
James Froggatt

Bonjour Monsieur Jean Baptiste Thevard,

J’ai récemment aidé un ami à construire une maison Greb et je prévois de construire une maison Greb à Puivert en France. J’ai le livre <> (3ème édition).

Nous sommes dans une zone sismique 3 à Puivert et sommes évidemment préoccupés par les risques liés à la technique Greb (notre maison est R+1, 10m x 8m) mais nous ne trouvons aucune information solide à ce sujet.

Pour essayer de trouver des informations, nous avons visité Apex Artisan à Limoux et ils nous ont suggéré de ne pas construire avec la technique Greb mais d’utiliser une technique différente où les balles sont insérées dans des murs en ossature simple et le contreventement est effectué avec plusieurs foulards diagonaux pour former la résistance au cisaillement.

Les balles de paille seraient ensuite recouvertes de mortier d’argile et de chaux. Le problème, c’est que je ne trouve aucune information où que ce soit où la résistance au cisaillement de cette méthodologie a été testée.

Il nous a dit que la technique Greb n’est pas conforme aux règles détaillées dans les <>, mais dans mon livre (3ème édition), clairement à la page 83, il y a une image de la Technique Greb mais je ne sais pas vraiment pourquoi elle n’est mentionnée comme la Technique Greb dans le livre. Je suis donc un peu confus.

J’ai quelques questions pour lesquelles j’aimerais vraiment recevoir de l’aide :

1) Est-ce que Greb se conforme au Règlement ?

2) La résistance au cisaillement d’une maison Greb est-elle conforme aux exigences sismiques et de vent ?

3) Est-ce qu’un contreventement additionnel d’une maison R+1 Greb (traverses Simpson par exemple) est nécessaire afin de s’assurer que la maison est conforme aux exigences sismiques ?

4) Pourquoi la technique d’accrochage n’est-elle pas nommée comme telle dans le livre <> ?

5) Avant la construction, dois-je attendre la 4e édition de <>. Dans l’affirmative, quelles sont les informations complémentaires contenues dans cette édition ?

Merci pour votre temps.

Sincèrement
James Froggatt

A 3D image of a house superimposed on a green field, with a line of small trees to the right

Here it is.

Up until now we’ve been using this blog as a “bucket” – to capture information, share it between us, and enable us to find it quickly when we need it. Things have been quietly moving on behind the scenes, so I think we’re at the point where we finally have something to blog about. Let’s begin!

We started this as the planning stage. When we found the land and discussed the purchase with the owner, the CU had six months left to run. We wanted to put a clause suspensive in the compromis de vente to say that the sale would be null and void in the event that we weren’t able to get planning permission. The owner checked with the notaire, who suggested we apply for planning permission in advance of progressing the purchase, so that’s what we did.

Now, almost a year on, we’re almost at the signing – and paying stage. Planning permission was obtained in February and (due to unforeseen Brexit-related events causing a two-month delay in our plans) the compromis was finally signed in June.

This means we’re in the last stages and we should at last be able to use the land, to progress our build.

There are two things going on. First, the sale is going through the usual administrative process, which means consultation with SAFER for the agricultural portion. Second, the etude du sol will be conducted in July and the results hopefully sent in August. This means we can plan (and cost) our foundation. We have a budget of 10,000 euros for this. Will it be enough!? We know that the land is clay and our DIY evaluation (involving a jam jar and some water) suggests it’s up to 90% clay, which is great news if we decide to go ahead with a “traditional” mud render.

And that’s the biggest decision we’re in the midst of. The big question that hovers over us now, is to GREB or not to GREB? More on that soon.

Greb wall shear strength


the bracing is ensured on both sides of the wall by a double masonry mortar. 
Laboratory tests have shown mechanical shear strength well above the requirements of Eurocodes and superior to the regulatory plates of DTU 31.2. “

le contreventement est assuré de part et d’autre de la paroi par un double mortier maçonné. Des tests en laboratoire ont mis en évidence la résistance mécanique au cisaillement largement supérieure aux exigences des Eurocodes et supérieur aux plaques réglementaires du DTU 31.2. “